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Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life Synopsis and Review

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WARNING: There are spoilers in this article. If you are someone who- like me- absolutely hates anything and anyone who in anyway spoils a book or movie, skip over. There are quite a few…
We, as Gilmore Girls enthusiasts, get enter the wonderfully quirky and (somewhat devastating) world of Stars Hollow once again, and we are so unbelievably glad.
Let’s go into some opinions, shall we?
I have mixed feelings about Rory’s boyfriend Pa

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ul (Jack Carpenter), who seemingly no one can remember exists. It was brilliant though, for the writers to introduce a new boyfriend right off the bat- one that will end the “Who is Rory going to end up with?” debacle. But like I said, no one thinks of him.
After all, Rory sleeps with two men and has an entire affair with Logan (Matt Czuchry) while they’re dating and while he’s engaged.
Of course, the update on Kirk’s (Sean Gunn) life was the most fun. He has a pet pig, and of course it was actually bought for him as a crowd funded gift from the entire town in order to distract him from having an actual child.
The way Emily embraces the “jeans lifestyle” seems like a quiet, beautiful portrait of her healing in the wake of Richard’s death. Yes, he dies, due to the death of the actual actor, Edward Herrmann.
Sookie (Melissa McCarthy) did return, but only for one episode and only for a short period of time, to have Lorelai choose from a series of wedding cakes. Such sweet sorrow.
Michel (Yanic Truesdale) is gay! It is revealed in a very matter-of-fact manner early on in the revival, with Michel mentioning his husband in one of his many lengthy rants.
Let me just say, everything that had to do with Paris was perfect- from her stature as the surrogacy specialist to her marriage and then divorce from Doyle to the fact that her crippling teenage anxiety never left her, as proven by that bathroom meltdown. Not to mention her new style is flawless.
Rory is a features writer, based on her interviews with a British feminist and work on a story about people who wait in lines.
The two big confrontations between the respective mother-daughter pairings (Lorelai/Rory and Emily/Lorelai) were gut-wrenching to say the least. That the post-funeral blowout between Lorelai and Emily was wrenching goes without saying, but I thought the argument after Lorelai tells Rory she doesn’t want her to write a book about their lives to have just the same effect. Deciding to go on a Wild-inspired hike to gain some clarity was exactly the kind of impulsive, part-healing, part-destructive thing Lorelai would do.
Lorelai’s epiphany that she wants to marry Luke- I can’t believe she wasn’t already married to Luke, but that’s beside the point- being triggered by coffee was right on the nose, and I wouldn’t have it any other way.
And of course (of course) they decided to end it with an explosion involving Rory being pregnant. Of course.
I would also like to say that it was highly disappointing that the Carole King “Where You Lead” theme song didn’t play at the beginning of each new episode. Such a great opportunity they missed.
The glorious series ended with a poetic representation of an unexpected circle of life- like mother, like daughter.

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Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life Synopsis and Review